Mikipedia

A random collection of ideas and images I remember to post on tumblr

Barbie packaged

Some parent do the craziest things for their children. 

This one woman thinks that a Barbie Photo Booth idea is great for her daughters’ B-day. The truth is it’s so scary that someone would comfortably put their kids in a box to look like a new Barbie on the market.

image

Her call was met with this response from another woman showing off her slender fitting box design with plastic wrapping as well. See below.image

I get claustrophobic just looking at it.

It worries me that women would want to put their girls through this, but I don’t think these parents are paying much attention to the fact that Barbie is an exemplar of a type of girl and woman-hood that has become a real expectation of women… and that image of a girl packaged drives home the reality that girls and women are objects and products to be bought and sold… girl trade.

I can’t find much good to say about Barbie, but ladies, she doesn’t need to be in a box. Let the girls be free Barbies at least.

I can’t recall hearing parents who would put their boys in a spiderman box package. So why should the girls be all packed up and dolled up? 

shazeeed:

Iloobia up to his old animated tricks again, this time with some of Orkibal’s characters. Go check our Stickerbomb facebook page >

https://www.facebook.com/stickerbomber

Future Oriental Octopus Clan… I like

I am yet to find someone who actually knows where I have come from. “Trinidad and Tobago” is just as confusing as “the Caribbean.” So I have become African, Jamaican, or American (which includes anywhere in the Americas, as it should)

—caribbean-beat.com/issue-125/one-year-in-bangkok#axzz2pGUX5Iy8

explore-blog:

Open Culture uncovers this fantastic photo of Virginia Woolf playing cricket with her sister, the celebrated artist Vanessa Bell, who illustrated some of Woolf’s books.
Woolf remembers:

Scenes, I note, seldom illustrate my relation with Vanessa; it has been too deep for ‘scenes’. Vanessa and I were both what we call tomboys; that is, we played cricket, scrambled over rocks, climbed trees, were said not to care for clothes and so on.
Until she was fifteen indeed, she was outwardly sober and austere, the most trustworthy, and always the eldest; sometimes she would lament her “responsibilities”. But beneath the serious surface … there burnt also the…passion for art. …Once I saw her scrawl on a black door a great maze of lines, with white chalk. “When I am a famous painter-” she began, and then turned shy and rubbed it out in her capable way…She was awkward as a long-legged colt.

Woolf, of course, was more than a tomboy. 
Pair with this lovely children’s book about Woolf and Bell, then see Woolf’s witty family newspaper, which she created in collaboration with her nephews, Bell’s two teenage sons. 

explore-blog:

Open Culture uncovers this fantastic photo of Virginia Woolf playing cricket with her sister, the celebrated artist Vanessa Bell, who illustrated some of Woolf’s books.

Woolf remembers:

Scenes, I note, seldom illustrate my relation with Vanessa; it has been too deep for ‘scenes’. Vanessa and I were both what we call tomboys; that is, we played cricket, scrambled over rocks, climbed trees, were said not to care for clothes and so on.

Until she was fifteen indeed, she was outwardly sober and austere, the most trustworthy, and always the eldest; sometimes she would lament her “responsibilities”. But beneath the serious surface … there burnt also the…passion for art. …Once I saw her scrawl on a black door a great maze of lines, with white chalk. “When I am a famous painter-” she began, and then turned shy and rubbed it out in her capable way…She was awkward as a long-legged colt.

Woolf, of course, was more than a tomboy

Pair with this lovely children’s book about Woolf and Bell, then see Woolf’s witty family newspaper, which she created in collaboration with her nephews, Bell’s two teenage sons. 

(Source: )

studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu on failure via Art 21

"In a sense, failure is a tail that’s chasing me. I’m running away from it, but it’s attached to me. It helps me project myself forward. It keeps me from looking backwards too much. At the same time, my work has grown bigger and moved further than I thought it would because I make mistakes along the way. For example, I’ve been making collages for years, but something will happen in the process of making a new body of work, and it will seem to ruin a piece. Sometimes it’s from over-flowing ink or over-spraying a section, basically doing something I didn’t mean to do, that forces me to look for a new trajectory, a new solution. I really do believe that embedded in a mistake is the next new idea, which is to me a metaphor for life and for death. That thing that kills a piece will grant life to another body of work. And the longer you live, the closer you come to dying, and the more you have to keep generating new ideas and new reasons to be here, to be useful, to be important, to be a living being."

Image: Wangechi Mutu, Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies began to fear her The End, 2013; site-specific installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy the Brooklyn Museum

studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu on failure via Art 21

"In a sense, failure is a tail that’s chasing me. I’m running away from it, but it’s attached to me. It helps me project myself forward. It keeps me from looking backwards too much. At the same time, my work has grown bigger and moved further than I thought it would because I make mistakes along the way. For example, I’ve been making collages for years, but something will happen in the process of making a new body of work, and it will seem to ruin a piece. Sometimes it’s from over-flowing ink or over-spraying a section, basically doing something I didn’t mean to do, that forces me to look for a new trajectory, a new solution. I really do believe that embedded in a mistake is the next new idea, which is to me a metaphor for life and for death. That thing that kills a piece will grant life to another body of work. And the longer you live, the closer you come to dying, and the more you have to keep generating new ideas and new reasons to be here, to be useful, to be important, to be a living being."

Image: Wangechi Mutu, Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies began to fear her The End, 2013; site-specific installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy the Brooklyn Museum

dynamicafrica:

Ousmane Sow, a 78-year-old sculptor from Senegal, has made history this year by becoming the first African ever to join France’s Academy of Fine Arts (Academie des Beaux-Arts Paris)

Renowned for his larger-than-life clay sculptures of various subjects ranging from various ethnic groups such as Nouba wrestlers, Peulh, Masai and Zulu peoples, to political figures such as anti-apartheid South African figure Nelson Mandela, revolutionary Haitian independence hero François-Dominique Toussaint Louverture and even French statesman Charles de Gaulle, Sow’s distinct and poignant style of work has led to him become one of the continent’s most well-known and sought after artists. 

(via gravalicious)